The Performance Pathway – an increasing track record of success

 

This success is accelerating and providing our dedicated and talented sailors with the confidence to continue on this Pathway towards the ultimate goal of bringing home the Gold from Tokyo. The progress achieved in the last few years with limited funding has been astounding and is gathering pace in an unprecedented way.

 

The Silver Medal won last summer by Annalise Murphy at the 2016 Olympics in Rio proved there was a consistency in our success. The Performance Pathway is clearly the right approach for creating a pipeline of talented athletes and the strategic and inspired coaching and training methods of the Performance team is paying dividends.

 

Progress Chart – Click here to view in full size

 

 

 

Archive Results

 

2016

A timely stock-take on last year’s top Irish junior sailing achievements at home and abroad provides further insight into where we’re going , knowing that while sailing ability can manifest itself at all ages, the key Olympic success years seem to be between 25 and 35.

 

With all Ireland still basking in the glow of Annalise Murphy’s Olympic Sailing Silver Medal, we can have little doubt that this is a game-changer in the provision of resources for our sailing. The central decision makers are analysing facts and figures which will guide them in their sourcing and allocation of support for developing facilities, for particular boat classes, and for individual athletes and their personal programmes.

 

 

The achievement of success in the face of limited resources was heart-warming stuff. But having seen since the very beginning of 2016 the return of young Irish sailors – some of them very young indeed – fresh from success in significant events abroad, it is reasonable to hope that as they progress up the ladder, they can expect support of a more structured kind than the ad hoc raising of funds we were seeing with young sailors like Finn Lynch, Aoife Hopkins, Ewan McMahon and several others, who had found themselves placing reliance on the kindness of strangers in sometimes very distant countries in order to nourish and develop their talents.

 

YOUTH WORLDS

420 Class: Douglas Elmes & Colin O’Sullivan: Bronze Medal

 

UK LASER NATIONALS

2nd Johnny Durcan, 3rd Fionn Conway, 4th Ronan Walsh

 

UK 29er NATIONALS

1st Harry Durcan/Harry Whittaker

 

LASER RADIAL WORLDS U19

2nd Nicole Hemeryck, 6th Jenny Fekkes, 8th Sally Bell.

 

LASER RADIAL WORLDS

Ewan McMahon: Silver Medal, 7th Johnny Durcan, 12th Conor O’Beirne.

 

 

LASER RADIAL WORLDS (Girls)

7th Nicole Hemeryck, 11th Aoife Hopkins

 

LASER RADIAL WORLDS U17

6th Ronan Walsh

 

TOPPER WORLDS

Girls: 1st Sophie Crosbie, 2nd Ella Hemeryck, 3rd Jenna McCarlie     Boys: 4th Michael Carroll, 6th Jack Fahy

 

UK OPTIMIST CHAMPIONSHIP

1st Tom Higgins Junior Fleet: 3rd Justin Lucas

 

 

 

LASER EUROPA CUP

Nieuwpoort

1st Ewan McMahon, 3rd Johnny Durcan

 

Hoorn

4th Liam Glynn, 5th Johnny Durcan

 

(Women)

1st Aoife Hopkins

 

Hyeres (U17)

1st Johnny Durcan, 2nd Ewan McMahon

 

LASER YOUTH EUROS

4th Liam Glynn

 

(Women)

4th Aoife Hopkins

 

EUROS U21

3rd Liam Glynn, 7th Ewan McMahon

 

The high point has to be Ewan McMahon’s winning of the Silver Medal at the KBC Laser Radial Worlds in Dun Laoghaire from 23rd to 30th July, a massive event which in all attracted nearly 350 entries from 48 countries. McMahon, who had just turned 17 in June, has by no means had it easy progressing to the top ranks. He found most fulfillment and great success in racing a 420, but became too tall for that two-man boat (he is now 6ft 2in), and had to find his way in the Laser Radial as best he could with no access to significant central funding during 2015.